Category: Featured

141  |  Sketching and Visual Thinking with Eva-Lotta Lamm

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Eva-Lotta Lamm joining us to talk about the value of sketching and how it relates to data visualization. Eva-Lotta is a UX designer turned expert on sketching and sketchnoting: the art of summarizing talks through sketches. In the show we talk about visual thinking, sketchnoting and parallels with data visualization.

Links


Related episodes

138  |  Turning Data into Sound with Hannah Davis

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

How do you represent data with sound instead of graphical properties? Is it even possible?

It turns out that it’s not only possible, but there is an entire field — called sonification — that is dedicated to representing data with sound.

In this episode we are joined by Hannah Davis, a data visualization and sonification expert, to talk about how sonification works and how she has gone about making her own amazing sonification projects, which create musical pieces based on data. Get your ears ready! This time you are not only going to listen to our voices but also to some really interesting sounds!

P.S. We’ve actually touched upon sonification once before in Data Stories. Check out our episode with Scott Hughes on the sonification of black holes.

LINKS


Related episodes

136  |  Simulated Dendrochronology of U.S. Immigration with Pedro Cruz and John Wihbey

[There are no ads on Data Stories because we’re listener-supported; please consider contributing to the show! Oh…and now Data Stories is on Instagram!]


We have Pedro Cruz and John Wihbey on the show to talk about their beautiful project, the Simulated Dendrochronology of U.S. Immigration. There are many ways that immigration can be represented visually, but Pedro and John came up with a very compelling one: they use the metaphor of tree rings to show how migration patterns of people to the United States have changed over time. The final piece is utterly beautiful and evocative: we are the product of many layers of immigration.

On the show we talk about how they came up with this idea, the implementation of the visualization, the attempts they tried before producing the final version, and the role of metaphors in visualization. Make sure you take a closer look at the visualization before listening!

And enjoy the show!

Links


Related episodes

135  |  The "Dashboard Conspiracy" with Lyn Bartram and Alper Sarikaya


[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thanks!]

Oh dashboards… dashboards… what are they? For some, they are just ugly examples of bad visualization design (speed dials anyone?). For others, they are a first citizen of the data visualization world that deserve to be learned, studied, and understood.

To dig into this debate, we have Lyn Bartram of Simon Fraser University and Alper Sarikaya of Microsoft Power BI on the show to talk about an exciting research project they developed. Their research seeks to build a better picture of what dashboard are and how they are used “in the wild.” The results are summarized in a paper they wrote with their colleagues from Tableau and Honeycomb.io: What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Dashboards?

On the show we talk about how the project got started, what they discovered by analyzing a large corpus of dashboards, and the many ramifications of their research.

Enjoy the show!

Links

  • Project page
  • Supplemental material with images of all the dashboards the team analyzed (zip)


Related episodes

134  |  Visualizing Uncertainty with Jessica Hullman and Matthew Kay

[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. Thanks!]

What is uncertainty? Why is it important to take it into account when designing data visualizations? And how do you actually do so? We explore these and other questions with Jessica Hullman of Northwestern University and Matthew Kay of the University of Michigan. Jessica and Matt have written many publications on the topic that help orient us to the intricate world of uncertainty, probabilities, and their relevance to data visualization.

We hope you enjoy the show!

Links


Related episodes

125  |  Researching the Boundaries of InfoVis with Sheelagh Carpendale

[If you like what we do, please consider supporting us on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. Data Stories runs thanks to your financial support. Thx!]

Sheelagh Carpendale is Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary, where she leads the Innovations in Visualization (InnoVis) research group. Sheelagh is one of the most prominent figures in visualization research and, this week, she joins us to discuss the research taking place in her lab, as well as her innovative ideas about all sorts of information visualization. Sheelagh is renowned for taking a much more holistic view of visualization than usual; she emphasizes interaction, visualization beyond the confinements of desktop displays, and the use of design, qualitative research, and psychology. On the show we talk about the uses of sketching in data visualization, the concept of “active reading” of visualizations, and the standard data viz ideas that are holding us back.

Enjoy the show!

Links



Related episodes

119  |  Color with Karen Schloss

[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. And now we also accept one-time donations through Paypal: just use this linkThanks so much for your support!]


In this episode we have Karen Schloss on the show to talk about color. Yes, color! Karen is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin Madison where she conducts research on the effective uses of color in visualization and everyday tasks.

Karen walks us through the intricacies of color: explaining how it works and why it is so hard to get right. We also discuss the infamous rainbow color map, the association between colors and meaning, the tools developed in her lab, and her fascinating research on coloring trash bins!

Enjoy the show…

Links


115  |  Human-Driven Machine Learning with Saleema Amershi

[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon!]

How should we interact with machine learning? Is there a way to better understand what machine learning systems do and how? What role can visualization play in machine learning? These are some of the questions we discuss with Saleema Amershi on the podcast this week.

Saleema is a Researcher at Microsoft Research AI (MSR AI) where she works on technologies for helping people build and use machine learning systems.

On the show we explore the need for interaction in machine learning and discuss some of the fascinating work Saleema has done in this space, as well as what visualization can do to make machine learning more transparent for its users.

Enjoy the show!

Links


109  |  Feminist Data Visualization with Catherine D’Ignazio

[If you enjoy Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. The show is now fully funded by our listeners!]


We have Catherine D’Ignazio on the show this week to talk about feminist data visualization. Catherine is Assistant Professor of Data Visualization and Civic Media at Emerson College, where she works across art, design, science and research.

On the show Catherine explains how feminist theory can be used as a lens to look at some interesting problems in visualization and data analysis in general. We also talk about the struggle between objectivity and relativism, methods to apply the guidelines proposed by Catherine to data visualization work, and some super interesting projects she has developed over the years.

Enjoy the show!

 

 



Links


Related episodes

103  |  Explorable Explanations with Nicky Case

[If you enjoy our show, please consider supporting us on Patreon! For the price of one or two lattes per episode, which we publish every two weeks, you can help make sure that Data Stories keeps getting made!]

This week we have Nicky Case on the show to talk about “explorable explanations,” interactive simulations that help people understand complex ideas.

Nicky has developed a whole set of projects over the years, including the popular “Parable Of The Polygons,” which describes how small biases can lead to segregation, and “To Build A Better Ballot,” which demonstrates the impact of various types of voting ballots.

On the show we talk about both of these projects in detail, the definition of explorable explanations, how simulation and interaction might play a role in visualization, and the future of this kind of project.

Enjoy the show!


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.


Links



Related episodes