Tag: Literacy

123  |  Touch Graphics with Steve Landau

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As creators of data visualization, it is important for us to remember that many of our platforms are not accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired. What can we do to help non-sighted people access the wealth of information that we convey visually?

To discuss this topic we have on the show Steve Landau, the founder of Touch Graphics, a company that develops products that “rely on multi-sensory display techniques and audio-haptic interactivity.”

We talk with Steve about the history of the company, the process for creating tactile graphics, and his suggestions for making visualization more accessible.

Enjoy the show!

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118  |  Making Data Visual with Miriah Meyer and Danyel Fisher

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This week we have Miriah Meyer (University of Utah) and Danyel Fisher (Microsoft Research) on the show to talk about their new book Making Data Visual, which covers areas that other visualization books typically do not address: namely, how to go from formulating questions to building visualizations that solve actual problems that people have.

On the show we talk about how the book came to be; some of the concepts introduced by Miriah and Danyel in the book, such as the use of proxy tasks for data;  and how you could use it for your own projects.

Enjoy the show!

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110  |  What's Going On In This Graph? with Michael Gonchar and Sharon Hessney

On the show this week we have  Michael Gonchar of the New York Times Learning Network and Sharon Hessney of the American Statistical Association to talk about the New York Times’s project, “What’s Going On In This Graph?

The project aims to improve students’ visual literacy by analyzing a specific chart and participating in online discussions. Each month the New York Times publishes a new chart and ask students to discuss it by answering a series of questions: What do you notice? What do you wonder? Are there items you notice that answer what you wonder? Where could you find the answers to what you wonder?

On the show we talk about how the project was born, how students participate in the process, what they learn, and our guests’ plans for the future of the series.

We strongly encourage you to participate! It’s fun and useful!

Enjoy the show!


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104  |  Visualization Literacy in Elementary School with Basak Alper and Nathalie Riche

[If you enjoy our show, consider supporting us on Patreon! You pay the amount of one or two lattes for each episode we publish every two weeks.]

In our latest episode, we talk about “C’est La Vis,” a research project developed to teach visualization at the elementary school level. We have two of the project researchers on the show, Basak Alper from NASA JPL and Nathalie Riche from Microsoft Research, to tell us all about it.

On the show we talk about the inception of the project, the findings they discovered by both talking to teachers and analyzing visualization materials used in schools, and the “C’est la Vis” prototype they have developed as a way to teach visualization to kids.

Enjoy the show!


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.


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094  |  Uncertainty and Trumpery with Alberto Cairo

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In this episode, we have Alberto Cairo from the University of Miami on the show to talk about his newly announced lecture series on “Trumpery” and uncertainty.

Visualization and statistics promise to help people think and behave more rationally, but as we all know there is much more to fulfilling this promise than just showing “the right” graph.

With Alberto we touch upon many topics including partisanship and rhetoric, visualizing uncertainty and risk, and cognitive biases.

There is of course always much more to say on these topics, but this is a good start!

Enjoy the show.


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.


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087  |  VizKidz: Books on Data Visualization for Kids

Hey, we talk about a super lovely project on the show today!

Book illustrator and product designer Abigail Ricarte and data journalist Liv Buli join us to talk about their Kickstarter project, VizKidz, an illustrated book series designed to teach kids about data visualization.

The series features four lovely characters: Penelope Pie, Laney Line, Barnaby Bar, and Bertie Boxplot, each with a specific “personality.”

On the show we talk about how the project started, how they designed the characters, and what it takes to launch a data visualization project on Kickstarter.

If you are interested in buying the book or learning more about the project, check out their website: http://www.vizkidz.rocks/.

Enjoy the show!

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Check out the blog post about how Qlik’s vice president taught first graders some data visualization skills. And make sure to try out Qlik Sense for free at: qlik.de/datastories.

 


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082  |  Information+ Conference Review

epi-title-info+Hey! Welcome back from summer vacation! We start the new season with an experiment. In this episode, we review three talks that were given at the Information Plus Conference. The Conference took place from June 16 -18 in Vancouver, Canada, and featured a whole array of amazing speakers.

For our review we selected three talks:

  1. Catherine D’Ignazio on “Creative Data Literacy: Bridging the Gap Between the Data Haves and Have-nots.”
  2. Karen Cheng on “Proving the Value of Visual Design in Scientific Communication.”
  3. Michele Mauri on “Why Designers Should Care about Wikipedia.”

Listen here for selections from each presentation, plus our comments and reflections on each talk.

And let us know how you like this new format! We may be able to repeat it again in the future.

Special thanks to our amazing producer Destry Sibley, who curated the selection of talks and created the snippets for this episode. And many thanks to Isabel Meirelles and the Information Plus team for making the material available to us.

Enjoy the show!


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by FreshBooks, the small business accounting software that makes your accounting tasks easy, fast and secure. FreshBooks is offering a month of free unrestricted use to all of our listeners. To claim your free month of FreshBooks, go to http://freshbooks.com/datastories and  sign up for free and without the use of a credit card. Note: remember to enter “Data Stories” in the section titled “I heard about FreshBooks from…”


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