Category: Episodes

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77 | Polygraph and The Journalist Engineer Matt Daniels

mattWe have Matt Daniels on the show, the “journalist engineer” behind Polygraph, a blog featuring beautiful journalistic pieces based on data. If you are not familiar with the site, stop now and take a look.

Matt starts with a simple question — for example, what songs from the ’90s are still popular? — and tries to answer it through data analysis and visualization. The result is always a well-crafted web page and applications, with a mix of data analysis, interactive graphics, and explanations.

On the show we talk specifically about two projects: “The most timeless songs of all-time,” in which Matt analyzes song popularity from Spotify data, and “Film Dialogue from 2,000 screenplays, Broken Down by Gender and Age,” in which he examines movie dialogues as a way to dig deeper into gender biases in the film industry.


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by CartoDB. CartoDB is an open, powerful, and intuitive platform for discovering and predicting the key facts underlying the massive location data in our world. Whether you are a business, government agency, or simply a lover of revolutionary spatial insight technology, don’t settle for anything less than the best interactive maps around. Learn how CartoDB is shaping the world of location intelligence at cartodb.com/gallery and check out the Location Data Services mentioned in the ad.


LINKS

Matt Daniels
Matt’s Medium article “The Journalist Engineer
Project: “The largest vocabulary in Hip Hop
Project: “How music taste evolved
Project: “The most timeless songs of all-time
Project: “Film Dialogue from 2,000 screenplays, Broken Down by Gender and Age
Washington Post: “Doctors fire back at bad Yelp reviews — and reveal patients’ information online” (Collaboration between Enrico’s Lab and ProPublica)


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76 | Bocoup and OpenVis Conference

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On the show this week we have Irene RosJim Vallandingham, and Yannick Assogba from the data visualization team of Bocoup. We talk about how they collaborate with other groups to create open-source data visualization software. We also talk about OpenVis Conference, the successful and innovative visualization event they organize each year, as well as the cool visualization projects they develop internally.


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by CartoDB. CartoDB is an open, powerful, and intuitive platform for discovering and predicting the key facts underlying the massive location data in our world. Whether you are a business, government agency, or simply a lover of revolutionary spatial insight technology, don’t settle for anything less than the best interactive maps around. Learn how CartoDB is shaping the world of location intelligence at cartodb.com/gallery.


LINKS
Irene Ros
Jim Vallandingham
Yannick Assogba
Voyager (Exploratory Visualization Tool from IDL)
Lyra (Chart Building Tool from IDL)
Bocoup’s self-commissioned project “Stereotropes
Bocoup’s educational initiatives
OpenVis Conference 2015
OpenVis Conference Video Archive
OpenVis Conference file of transcripts
Contact the OpenVis Conference team
Lisa Charlotte Rost’s blog posts “One Chart, Twelve Tools” and “One Chart, Twelve Charting Libraries



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75 | Listening to Data From Space with Scott Hughes

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Dear friends, we are really excited to publish our first “data sonification” episode ever! After many years of searching for the right person, subject and format, we are happy to publish this fantastic episode with Scott Hughes from MIT. Scott is an astrophysicist and a key figure at LIGO, the laser interferometer project that finally allowed scientists to “listen” to the sound of two colliding black holes.

Here Scott talks about how he decided to sonify his data and how sonification is being used by scientists to understand astrophysical phenomena.

Listen as we play a number of samples; Scott walks us through their meaning and the physics behind them. It’s really really cool. Warm up your ears!

You can also listen to some samples from Scott Hughes and his team here:

 

 

  • Simulation of a final collision of two massive black holes, what Scott calls “the ringing mode” of a black hole. All that is audible is the last “pop” of the system settling down to a single black hole.

     

  • Two objects moving past each other in space. The gravitational waves in this case are loud when the small body moves close to the large body (its motion is fast during that part of the orbit), and they are quiet when the small body is far away (when its motion is slow).

     

  • Also, take a look at the many links that we have added below. You can listen to the sounds yourself and discover a number of additional sonification projects.

Huge thanks to Scott for spending so much time with us preparing the sounds and recording the show. We loved it!


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by CartoDB. CartoDB is an open, powerful, and intuitive platform for discovering and predicting the key facts underlying the massive location data in our world. Whether you are a business, government agency, or simply a lover of revolutionary spatial insight technology, don’t settle for anything less than the best interactive maps around. Learn how CartoDB is shaping the world of location intelligence at cartodb.com/gallery.


LINKS

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74 | Data Ethics and Privacy with Eleanor Saitta

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We have Eleanor Saitta on the show to talk about data privacy. Eleanor is “a hacker, designer, artist, writer, and barbarian.” She is also Etsy’s new Security Architect.

During our chat we discuss the fine line between the excitement of being able to work with great data sets and the many — oftentimes unexpected — privacy risks associated with it.

 

 


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Make sure to check out the data visualization mapping tutorial on the Qlik Blog. You can try out Qlik Sense for free at: qlik.de/datastories.


LINKS


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73 | Kim Albrecht on Untangling Tennis and the Cosmic Web

Kim is a visualization researcher and information designer. He currently works at the Center for Complex Network Research, the lab led by famous network physicist László Barabási.

Kim works in a team of scientists to create effective and beautiful visualizations that explain complex scientific phenomena.

In the show we focus on Untangling Tennis, a data visualization project aimed at explaining the relationship between popularity and athletic performance. We also talk about his more recent project, the Cosmic Web, which visualizes 24,000 galaxies and their network of gravitational relationships.

Enjoy the show!


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Make sure to check out the blog post listing Visualization Advocate Patrik Lundblad’s favorite data visualization pioneers. You can try out Qlik Sense for free at qlik.de/datastories.

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72 | Jeff Heer on Merging Industry and Research with the Interactive Data Lab

Jeff Heer is Associate Professor at the University of Washington where he leads the Interactive Data Lab (IDL). Jeff has worked on many visualization libraries and software programs, including Prefuse, Flare, Protovis and the widely adopted D3 (with his former PhD student Mike Bostock). Jeff is also the co-founder of Trifacta, a data analytics company focused on data wrangling.

On the show we talk about many interesting research tools and products developed in Jeff’s lab, including Vega, Voyager and Lyra. We also talk about Trifacta and the challenges and promises of visualization research.

Enjoy the show!


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Let your instincts lead the way to create personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards with Qlik Sense, which you can download for free at www.qlik.de/datastories. Make sure to check out their post on truth & beauty (!) at the Qlik blog.


 


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71 | Tapestry Conference Review with Robert Kosara

Hey guys, this is a special edition from Tapestry, the conference on Data Storytelling that brings together visualization experts, journalists, designers, NGOs, academics, and more.

Enrico sits down with Robert Kosara to recap the conference, especially the keynotes and some of the short story talks. Plus, Robert fills us in on how to participate in Tapestry conferences in the future.

Enjoy the show!

Links

The transcript for this episode is available here.


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Download Qlik Sense for free at http://www.qlik.de/datastories. For all Quantified Selfers, a senior member of Qlik’s Demo Team, Michael Anthony, has published his 2015 “My Life In Data” Report, where he tracks life events including miles run, coffees consumed, commuting mileage, food eaten and more!


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70 | Rocket Science with Rachel Binx

Hey, we talk about space and spacecrafts in this episode!

We have Rachel Binx on the show to discuss her experience developing data visualization software for NASA JPL.

NASA operators need to look at telemetry data coming from spacecrafts to make sense of what is happening in our skies. Super fascinating topic.

On the show we talk about the project, the process for NASA data collection and analysis, and how to write code that goes into space!

You can find the transcript for this episode here. Enjoy the show.


This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by Quadrigram, a web based application designed to bring data stories to life. With Quadrigram you can create and share interactive data stories without the need of any coding skills.


LINKS


Dealing with time / Moment.js http://momentjs.com/

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68 | Poemage: Data Visualization for Poets with Miriah Meyer and Nina McCurdy

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We have Miriah Meyer (Assistant Professor at Univ. of Utah) and Nina McCurdy (PhD student at Univ. of Utah) on Data Stories for a project episode about the lovely Poemage, “a visualization system for exploring the sonic topology of a poem.”

Miriah and Nina worked hand-in-hand with a group of poets to design a tool that visualizes a poem and, as such, provides inspiration for interesting poetic structures and solutions.

On the show we talk about how they derived phonological information from text, how the project evolved, and how data visualization tools can be designed to support creativity.

Listen here or read the transcript. Either way, enjoy the show!

 

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by Quadrigram, a web based application designed to bring data stories to life. With Quadrigram you can create and share interactive data stories without needing any coding skills.

LINKS

67 | ggplot2, R, and data toolmaking with Hadley Wickham

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We have Hadley Wickham on the show, Chief Scientist at RStudio and Adjunct Professor of Statistics at Rice University and the University of Auckland.

Hadley created a number of hugely popular libraries for the R language, including ggplot2, which is used throughout the world to analyze and present data.

On the show we talk about his creative process to develop ggplot2, its growing popularity, other libraries he has built in the R ecosystem, and strategies for creating popular software for data analysis and visualization.

Enjoy listening to Hadley Wickham, or read the transcript from our interview here!


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Take part in the Open Data Challenge for a chance to win $10,000 for an app created with Qlik Sense!

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