Category: Episodes

115 | Human-Driven Machine Learning with Saleema Amershi

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How should we interact with machine learning? Is there a way to better understand what machine learning systems do and how? What role can visualization play in machine learning? These are some of the questions we discuss with Saleema Amershi on the podcast this week.

Saleema is a Researcher at Microsoft Research AI (MSR AI) where she works on technologies for helping people build and use machine learning systems.

On the show we explore the need for interaction in machine learning and discuss some of the fascinating work Saleema has done in this space, as well as what visualization can do to make machine learning more transparent for its users.

Enjoy the show!

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114 | Machine Learning for Artists with Gene Kogan

 

 

 

 

[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon!]

If you haven’t heard talk about machine learning (ML) lately, you must be living under a rock! For our part, we have finally managed to record a whole episode on the use of ML for art and visualization. Artist and programmer Gene Kogan joins us on the show to talk about new developments in this space, as well as new challenges and opportunities. Gene has developed numerous art and design pieces using ML technologies, which we also discuss on the show. (You should definitely check out his home page: http://genekogan.com/). Last, we talk about the role of ML in visualization and how you can integrate ML in your own projects.

Enjoy!

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113 | What Makes A Visualization Memorable? with Michelle Borkin

It’s a whole new year! Consider supporting Data Stories on Patreon!

Michelle Borkin is Assistant Professor at Northeastern University where she studies the use of visualization in science research, in particular how it impacts human perception and cognition. On the show we talk about how the data viz community can better support the work of scientists, her popular research on data visualization memorability and, of course, the infamous data viz dinosaur.

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112 | Data Pottery with Alice Thudt

There are infinite ways to represent data. Here’s one of the more creative ones: Alice Thudt makes pottery — such as cups, plates, or teapots — that show data! Her project Life in Clay started off as a twist on a hobby, and has since become part of her PhD research on personal data visualization. In our conversation with Alice, we learn all about what it takes to put data on the table.

PS: At the end, you’ll also hear a quick update on the Information is Beautiful awards, where Alice scored an honorable mention! Congratulations!


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111 | Data Vis Around The World in 2017

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We are at the end of yet another full year, folks! And once again we have decided to go around the world to see what has happened in vis in a whole range of countries.

It’s been a long journey. This year we have, Spe Chen from Beijing, China; Pia Faustino from Manila, Philippines; Pinar Dag in Istanbul, Turkey; Justin Yarga from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Harry Stevens in New Delhi, India; and Qristina Parjiani from Tbilisi, Georgia.

Let us know how your year was and what you expect from 2018!

Happy Holidays everyone and thanks for listening!

 

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110 | What’s Going On In This Graph? with Michael Gonchar and Sharon Hessney

On the show this week we have  Michael Gonchar of the New York Times Learning Network and Sharon Hessney of the American Statistical Association to talk about the New York Times’s project, “What’s Going On In This Graph?

The project aims to improve students’ visual literacy by analyzing a specific chart and participating in online discussions. Each month the New York Times publishes a new chart and ask students to discuss it by answering a series of questions: What do you notice? What do you wonder? Are there items you notice that answer what you wonder? Where could you find the answers to what you wonder?

On the show we talk about how the project was born, how students participate in the process, what they learn, and our guests’ plans for the future of the series.

We strongly encourage you to participate! It’s fun and useful!

Enjoy the show!


[If you enjoy Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. The show is now fully funded by our listeners!]


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109 | Feminist Data Visualization with Catherine D’Ignazio

[If you enjoy Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. The show is now fully funded by our listeners!]


We have Catherine D’Ignazio on the show this week to talk about feminist data visualization. Catherine is Assistant Professor of Data Visualization and Civic Media at Emerson College, where she works across art, design, science and research.

On the show Catherine explains how feminist theory can be used as a lens to look at some interesting problems in visualization and data analysis in general. We also talk about the struggle between objectivity and relativism, methods to apply the guidelines proposed by Catherine to data visualization work, and some super interesting projects she has developed over the years.

Enjoy the show!

 

 



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108 | Review of IEEE VIS’17 with Jessica Hullman and Robert Kosara

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We have Jessica Hullman from the University of Washington and Robert Kosara from Tableau Software on the show this week to share highlights from the IEEE VIS 2017 conference, which took place in Phoenix, Arizona in early October.

On the show, we discuss a number of interesting papers, panels and talks that were given at the conference. Of course, this is just a tiny portion of what took place in Phoenix! If you want to know more, take a look at the conference website.



 


 

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.


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107 | Visualizing Bitcoin with Dan McGinn

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This episode we have Dan McGinn from Imperial College in London on the show to talk about visualizing Bitcoin data. Dan and his colleagues have developed real-time visualizations of transactions in the “blockchain,” the public ledger used by Bitcoin to create and document transactions.

The visualizations are displayed in their Data Observatory, a beautiful, high-resolution, 64-screen distributed rendering of a cluster with a canvas of 132M pixels.

On the show we discuss Bitcoin and how it works, the visualizations Dan and his colleagues have developed, and what can be done next to visualize cryptocurrencies.

Enjoy the show!

 


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.


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106 | Data Sculptures with Adrien Segal

In this episode, we have artist and sculptor Adrien Segal on the show to talk about her beautiful, thoughtful, and engaging data sculptures.

Adrien is based in Oakland, California. Her work has been exhibited internationally in galleries and museums around the world.

On the show, we talk about some her great artwork, including Tidal Datum, which depicts tidal charts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Grewingk Glacier, an ice sculpture depicting “the shape of the terminus of Grewingk Glacier as it has receded over 150 years time.”

We also talk about the process Adrien follows for her sculpture production, her thinking about work in physical versus digital materials, the boundaries between art and science, and how listeners might experiment with their own data sculptures!

Enjoy the show!


A minor correction to the show: It takes 29 days for the moon to go around the Earth, not the Sun. 


Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.


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